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Thursday, May 5, 2016

Nursing school accredited

Thursday, July 19, 2012

100 YEARS AGO

(1912)

The contracting firm of Thogmartin & Gardiner was last night at Nevada awarded the contract for the construction of three blocks of brick pavement that are to be put in this year. Work on the contract will be started during the next few weeks. The firm will also put in the concrete curbing and guttering, as well as a number of sidewalks.

The committee has made some commendable changes for the picnic this year at Arcadia. The most important is an admittance fee of only 10 cents charged at the main entrance which procures a pass ticket entitling the holder to all the privileges of the ball game, races and park. Children under 10 years of age are admitted free.

Opening day is free to all. And as there is no one to take up tickets, the holder is at liberty to go and come at his pleasure, the only requisite being to show your ticket when entering the gate.

Work is going to be started soon on the repairing of the street car tracks at the junction of Wall and Main streets. The bricks are raised so that the sharp edges stick in the air.

This place has always been a bad one for the automobiles. The repairing will be looked upon with favor by people who drive buggies, also.

75 YEARS AGO

(1937)

HONOLULU (by the Associated Press July 10) -- The mystery of Amelia Earhart lay locked in the silent watery wastes of the vast Pacific today. Four naval vessels and the 1,500 weary men who sought her and her navigator for 16 days gave them up for dead and sailed for home. Somewhere near the dot which is Howland Island, Miss Earhart and Noonan dropped from the skies in their fuelless airplane on a 2,570-mile flight from Lae, New Guinea, to the mid-Pacific sandpit. The 39-year-old woman fly er, known the world over for her aviation exploits, was circling the earth "just for fun," she said, but also to blaze possible new commercial routes.

The brick gymnasium and auditorium which is being added to the Bronson school building as a WPA project is well under way. The addition should be completed in time for use during the coming school year.

The maximum temperature yesterday was only 81--36 degrees under the summer's high of 117.5 a year ago yesterday. Rains in nearly every part of the state over the weekend have given Kansas the most encouraging July outlook in three years, federal meteorologist S.D. Flora said.

50 YEARS AGO

(1962)

Editorial Comment:

A recent new item appearing on page 2 of The Tribune to the effect that the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing had received national accreditation may have seemed to some readers as a rather casual note among the big happening of the day. To administrators of the Mercy Hospital and the School of Nursing, and to others who know a little of the history and background of the school, the report was highly significant.

The fact is that a school of nursing does not win national accreditation easily or quickly. The school here was built from rather a small beginning, and while its enrollment is still not large compared with some other schools, it now boasts a physical plant, a curriculum and administration that rank it among the top nursing schools of the country. That is what the accreditation means.

Much of the credit for building the school and winning the accreditation must go to its director, Sister Mary Julita, who will soon be transferred to a position of large responsibility in similar work in St. Louis.

Nell Dikeman
Memories spring eternal ...