[Masthead] Fair ~ 82°F  
High: 82°F ~ Low: 59°F
Monday, July 28, 2014

An auctioneer and blacksmith

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

100 YEARS AGO

(1912)

Eighty-five officers of the Kansas National Guard spent a busy week at Fort Leavenworth. A very interesting talk was made by Major Fuller. He said in part: "The government is desirous of getting soldiers with brains in time of war. Should the occasion arise, this government would require the services of 2,500 additional officers and most of them would come from the National Guard. Some of them would at once take high rank because of this training."

Time Savers:

Any stove blacking will stay on longer and be free from dust if a few drops of molasses are added to the blacking before using.

When putting anything very hot into glass dishes, set the dish on a wet cloth and the danger of cracking is lessened.

Use salt water and a brush to clean bamboo furniture, then rub very dry with soft cloths.

75 YEARS AGO

(1937)

When Col. Tom Macon takes his stout cane in hand and pounds on the floor tomorrow in the arena at the sales pavilion at Third Street and Scott Avenue, he will start off the last auction sale in the building. The structure has been purchased by Standard Advertising & Printing Company for a warehouse in connection with a new building to be built on the corner of the site. Tom Macon's colorful life has been bound up inextricably with his career as an auctioneer and before that as a blacksmith in the days when a blacksmith was a community's leading figure. Mr. Macon came to Fort Scott in 1909. Tomorrow Tom Macon will look back on a life crowded with dealings with human nature in the mass and as individuals. He never was afforded formal schooling, but his three years under C.S. Steele, the blacksmith, he counts as his valuable educational experience.

50 YEARS AGO

(1962)

Photo caption: "Miss Carolyn Thompson places the crown upon Carol Jean Perry, who was judged Bourbon County's Dairy Princess Saturday. Miss Perry is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Perry, Bronson. Miss Thompson, Chanute, is the 1961 Kansas Dairy Princess."--Tribune photo

Enrollment for summer swimming classes begins tomorrow at the YMCA, according to Fred Campbell, recreation director. The instructions will be for beginners and for swimmers, both boys and girls

Photo caption: "Mrs. Emma Connolly's ready smile is even more pronounced at the thought of the extra time she will have with her grandchildren after her retirement from public office July 1. She is retiring from her duties as clerk in the county superintendent's office in the Courthouse."--Tribune photo

Ben Franklin has exciting beach toys: wet 'n wonderful 70 x 16 inch plastic pool with 220-gallon capacity, $798; colorful sport ball in stripes and dots 20-inch in diameter, 49 cents; Flintstones decorate 20-inch swim ring, 79 cents. Open late till 8:30 Thursday and Saturday.

25 YEARS AGO

(1987)

Officials of the J.C. Penney Co. announced that the store here will close Jan. 2, 1988, after 66 years in downtown Fort Scott. "Economic realities have given us no other option," said Les Kennedy, Overland Park-based district manager for Penney's stores in eastern Kansas and northern Missouri. "The store has not met company expectations for sales and profit for a number of years. We no longer can provide the kind of merchandise selection and service that our customers deserve." The store at 23 S. Main is the third address J.C. Penney Co. has occupied here since the first Fort Scott store opened in 1922. Previous locations were 6 S. Main St. and on North Main Street.

Nell Dikeman
Memories spring eternal ...