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Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Stranded cow shows flood extent

Thursday, October 6, 2011

100 YEARS AGO

(1911)

The county officials from this city spent yesterday at the Uniontown fair. They returned last night and were back in their offices today.

The Brick Plant manager, D.P. Thomas, said today that the company soon will have plenty of brick for the South Main Street improvement. All of the concreting has been completed and that the laying of brick on a part of the street is all that remains.

Ask your pharmacist if a graduate of the Kansas University School of Pharmacy cannot fill his prescriptions correctly and in a way that will guarantee you speedy recovery from sickness. Have us fill your prescriptions.--James Lear Jr., 14 S. Main St.

If you want to keep your coffee hot at night, the water and milk or any other liquid, get the real "Thermos" bottle at Lear's Drug Store. --Leer's Drug Store, 14 S. Main St.

75 YEARS AGO

(1936)

Fort Scott is facing another flood menace today following extremely heavy rains south and west of here last night. The Marmaton began rising rapidly at daybreak and at 1 o'clock this afternoon was running 18 feet over the pumphouse dam, and rising a the rate of six inches an hour.

At that hour the water was standing four feet over Highway 54 near the Missouri Pacific shops and Mill Creek lacked only a foot of being over Highway 69 south of the Mill Creek bridge in Belltown. Flood waters were beginning to spread over the lowlands. Buck Run had backed up past Third Street and Othick Park, filled to the top, was threatening to spread out over South Clark and East First streets.

In the Uniontown-Redfield vicinity, precipitation was estimated from four to six inches. This morning, the Marmaton spread over Highway 54 near the old Hartman farm east of Uniontown.

50 YEARS AGO

(1961)

FSHS Teen Talk (By Kathy Hewett)

One of the new classes that has brought a lot of response from students in dramatics and stage craft is that of Mrs. Lucile James, who has four hours of drama students. Says Mrs. James, "Drama is an activity" and truer words were never spoken. Just ask any drama student. As for actual drama work, the classes have done imitation and pantomimes, a duet act and they are now working on another memorized duet act.

But this not just a class where students learn how to act, although they are learning that, too. Besides the acting, students have studied correct pronunciation of many mispronounced words, learned technique of staging and acting, memorized pages of theater terms, learned to execute various stage movements correctly and they recently studied early Greek, Roman and medieval drama.

These assignments and activities, enhanced by Mrs. James' enthusiasm and inspiration, make drama an interesting and worthwhile class for any student.

25 YEARS AGO

(1986)

Photo caption: "A stranded cow balances atop a floating trailer near the North Crawford Street Bridge Friday afternoon. More than 250 animals were released from the Fort Scottt Sales Co."

At 7:30 a.m. today the sun broke through the trees east of the National Avenue Bridge. The Marmaton River seemed strangely quiet, almost pastoral. The river looked almost normal except for the film of oil and swirling eddies and the powerful odor of diesel fuel.

The trees that hang over the river are festooned, like Christmas trees, with scraps of insulation backing.

A floating fertilizer trailer from Double Circle Farm Supply was snagged by the bridge's handrail like someone hung it out to dry and another is perched in a tree.

At 9:30 a.m. Sunday two men who had been taking photographs of the flooding died when their small plane crashed into an embankment east of the U.S. 69 Bypass between Wall and Third streets. The dead were Rick Litwin, 26, and Doug Bean, 23.

Nell Dikeman
Memories spring eternal ...